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Posts Tagged ‘Syntience’

We are the Music Makers and We are the Dreamers of Dreams

February 20, 2010 Leave a comment

We are the music makers,
And we are the dreamers of dreams,
Wandering by lone sea-breakers,
And sitting by desolate streams;—
World-losers and world-forsakers,
On whom the pale moon gleams:
Yet we are the movers and shakers
Of the world for ever, it seems.

Arthur O’Shaughnessy

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Syntience Launches New Website

For the new decade, we have launched a newly redesigned website. Comments are welcomed on the design.

With the new website, expect some other interesting things to come out into the open as well.

Stay tuned!

Syntience Inc.

Syntience Inc.

Syntience & Semantic Search

December 10, 2009 4 comments

From our new Use Case Document (v1.0) on our speculated use of Artificial Intuition (AN) technology applied to finally and truly solving Semantic Search:

Syntience Inc.

We Understand.

True “Semantic Search” is the holy grail of Web Search. When indexing web pages, the pages will be fed through an Artificial Intuition based device that produces a set of “semantic tokens”. These tokens might look like large integers; they are opaque to humans. But they specify, as a group, to any compatible AN device what the web page is ABOUT. It is a trivial matter to add those tokens to the search index side by side with the words in the document, which is what is currently stored in the index.

At query time, the same algorithm is run on the userʼs query. Longer queries will now become more precise queries since they allow more context to be activated. A set of semantic tokens can now be extracted from the userʼs query and matched in the index lookup process just the way words are looked up today. Even short queries can generate many relevant semantic tokens in a cascading process we could call “regeneration” – when a sufficiently specific query sentence is entered, all tokens identifying the context will be regenerated from the query. [Note: This is an expected but not yet experienced effect.]

The result will be a high precision search that returns documents that perfectly match the userʼs query. There will be no false positives caused by ambiguous word meanings, and some documents returned may not even contain the words in the userʼs query but they will still be spot-on ABOUT what the user wanted the results to be about. All efforts that have been called “Semantic Search” to date are still syntax based. Some, like PowerSetʼs technology, use grammars. But grammars are not semantics, they are describing syntax. This use of the term “Semantic Search” is a marketing parable.

Final version should be available for wide distribution soon.  Email me if you would like a copy at mgusek at syntience dot com.