Home > Strategy, Strategy Shift > The Awesome Power of Pull, Part I

The Awesome Power of Pull, Part I

In the post  Catastrophic Forgetting, I mentioned that there are some very big brains working on creating new strategies for businesses and the economy at large.  The ideas presented by these folks centers around the concept of the Big Shift.  Though I am not a strategy professional, per se (Read, I don’t want to learn the old stuff, because it is quickly becoming useless.), I tend to be able to separate the chaff from the wheat when it comes to information.  The authors of the Big Shift idea, John Seely Brown, John Hagel III, and my “internet friend”, Lang Davison have hit on a description of a new way of living within uncertainty with which I cannot help but agree.  If you are a business professional, I suggest you read up on the Big Shift and furthermore read up on the meaning of Edges and Cores.  Mmmmmm…That’s good n’ tasty heresy.

For the purpose of this post on Pull, I am going to start by introducing some terms that will grease the wheels in later posts.  Here’s the first, which can be considered the opposite of “Pull”.  Here’s a brief introduction to “Push”:

Command and Control

So many of us run around existing in frameworks and don’t even know it.  Many of us are blind to the fact that these frameworks are designed to support a current worldview keeping power in our organizations flowing in a specific direction.  In the case of Command and Control (C&C), absolute power is held by those at the top.  You see, C&C exists in it’s current “2BIG2FAIL” mode for a few reasons:

  • The military originally created C&C and soldiers “trained” to always follow orders to ensure objectives were met according to orders issued
  • The railroads adopted C&C not only to keep tight control over train schedules (no crashes = good), but also to keep coal moving to centers of production
  • Just like coal, the flow of oil can never stop so C&C models were again adopted as necessary to ensure productivity nationwide
  • When the modern business structure was created for service and office workers, oil and coal became capital or “resources” and tons of models popped up to ensure conservation of resources through creative control mechanisms

Why did people think (and many think to this day) that C&C was such a great idea?

In my next post, I will delve into the “mechanical worldview” (which is currently clinging for life) in the context of Push v. Pull which I hope will simply answer the question above.

And who are the mechanical worldview believers?  These are the folks that still think the world can be explained neatly.  That everything can be contained and defined.  And that people are machines too…Self-interested sociopaths, only seeking resources selfishly.  We are rapidly finding this not to be the case…

To be continued!

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  1. October 29, 2009 at 9:33 PM

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